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Who are considered family and household members?
a. Spouse
b. Former spouse
c. Persons living together as spouses or otherwise cohabiting
1. Persons living as spouses must have lived with the offender within five years prior to the incident unless the victim is the natural parent of the offender's child.
d. Parents, children or other persons related by blood or marriage who are living or have lived with the offender.
e. Persons who have a child(ren) together do not have to have lived together in order to qualify under this statute.
f. Other types of relationships not mentioned above may be covered under this statute, but they must be examined on a case by case basis.

If all of the above apply and the prosecutor's office has assisted you in filing a criminal charge, then you need to call to see if the suspect has been served with the criminal complaint. Once the suspect has been served with their paperwork they will be assigned an arraignment date. At this point is when you will have a hearing for your protection order.

Guide to Protection orders

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1. What are Protection Orders?
2. Are all Protection Orders the same?
3. Who can get a Criminal Protection Order?
4. How do I get a Criminal Protection Order?
5. Who are considered family and household members?
6. How long does the order last?
7. Can I get a Criminal Protection Order any time?
8. Why do I have to come to the Arraignment?
9. What will happen in Arraignment?
10. What should I do if there is a violation of the Protection Order?